Dr Jessica Hall

Research Fellow

Jessica.Hall@bthft.nhs.uk

ORCID: 0000-0003-3622-9598

Jess joined the Academic Unit for Ageing and Stroke Research as a Research Fellow in September 2013 on the LoTS 2 care project. This research involved developing and testing a longer-term integrated stroke care strategy focused on improving the quality of life of stroke survivors and their carers. In 2014, Jess was awarded a 110 Anniversary Scholarship at the University of Leeds to undertake her PhD research which was awarded in 2018. The work is focused on designing an intervention to support carers of stroke survivors using an Intervention Mapping approach.

Jess started as a Research Fellow in the Academic Unit of Elderly Care and Rehabilitation (AUECR) in October. She is working on the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) funded research programme which aims to develop and evaluate a complex intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour after stroke (RECREATE).

Jess completed her degree in Psychology in 2011 at Leeds Metropolitan University. She then went on and studied a master of science degree (MSc) at the University of Leeds in ‘Psychological Approaches to Health’; where she graduated in 2012.Throughout these degree programmes she utilised various qualitative methods e.g. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and Discourse Analysis in research addressing body image and childhood obesity. Since graduating from her MSc, Jess has spent time gaining clinical and research experience in the Learning Disabilities Directorate within the Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation trust.

Publications

Hall JF, Crocker TF, Clarke DJ. Forster A. Supporting carers of stroke survivors to reduce carer burden: development of the Preparing is Caring intervention using Intervention Mapping. BMC Public Health 2019, 19:1408; doi:10.1186/s12889-019-7615

Corepal R, Hall JF, English C, Farrin A, Fitzsimons CF, Forster A, Lawton R, Mead G, Clarke D. A protocol for a systematic review of process evaluations of interventions investigating sedentary behaviour in adults. BMJ Open 2019; 9:e031291. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2019-031291